Bully clients

Most of us hate bullies. One day I might write about my school days if I can bear to think about it. At school we were largely trapped and felt there was little we could do about bullying.

In business we come across bullies too but we really do not have to put up with bad behaviour. I remember when I was an employee telephoning a client, someone quite famous, to tell him one of his companies owed a lot of tax because he had done something without asking us, his advisers, first. He shouted and raged and swore. I told him I would speak to him later when he felt better, and put the telephone down. Fortunately when I told my boss, he agreed I had done the right thing, so I had his full support. That guy had a poor track record for abusing our staff. My boss should have dumped him but probably the fees were too important to him and his fellow partners.

In my own business I do not put up with such people as clients. Usually on first meeting someone I get a feeling whether we can work together, but if later I do have any unanticipated “aggravation” I do not put up with it. I ask the client to go elsewhere.

No one should have to put up with bad language and bad behaviour from a client. You don’t, do you?

Do you have a tax issue I can help you with? Get in touch and I will guide you.

Why arrogance has no place in business

I have been reflecting recently about the danger of arrogance in our business lives. I think it can come to some people through complacency. They feel that they know what they are doing, they have been doing it a fair time, and they know best. An attitude like that may lead to bullying too.

An arrogant person may indeed know his or her subject very well, and be very good at teasing out the finer points in their analysis of problems they seek to solve, but an arrogant person is also someone who does not communicate properly with the people who most need their help. An arrogant person ultimately is someone facing the risk of failure, because without being able to talk to or persuade people, any solution proposed will not be heeded.

Some of you may be familiar with the TV series “House” starring Hugh Laurie as a brilliant doctor and diagnostician. The premise of this very good programme originating from Fox in the US is that Dr House hardly ever sees patients because he in not interested in them, only in the diagnosis of their illness. He is very self-centred and very rude to almost everyone, but he is protected by his team of doctors who deal with and talk to the patients as well as carrying out any necessary tests. Dr House is also a bully, though he always thinks that his bullying is for the victim’s own good. Of course this is entertainment, and one needs to see a few episodes to enjoy the in-jokes and characters, and like many beers the series is an acquired taste.

In fact the premise of the progamme is not so absurd. I understand many doctors do become very arrogant, though perhaps not usually quite to the degree of the Dr. House character.

I am sure most of us have known arrogant but clever people in our working lives, including some who were bullies too. Imagine if we small business owners and employees adopted this attitude with our clients and customers. We cannot rely on our team to protect us. Imagine we believed we knew everything there is to know, and our clients were wrong and did not know what was good for them. Suppose we did not listen to them. We might understand their problem and make a diagnosis, and we may know how to fix it and provide a solution, but if we just told them – barked it out – they would feel intimidated and shy away. We would lose business that we should have gained and our clients would not get their solution unless they found someone more amenable who was as capable as we of delivering it.

Arrogance can be the price of experience and of knowledge but a little humility can go a long way in engaging our clients both in the formal way and in helping to solve their problems.

© Jon Stow 2009

“House”